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Tag: Rehabilitation

Positive thinking can help patients with whiplash injuries recover much faster

The idea of positive thinking might not be new to you, and they even did a documentary about it (The Secret), but it seems that it does work. Researchers in Alberta looked at a group of 6,000 adults traffic related whiplash injuries and found that those who had positive outlooks towards their recovery actually recovered three times faster than those who did not. They also found that 42% of those who had positive thinking returned faster to work.

You can watch the video below from CTV for more information:

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Acupuncture helps relieve back pain

A new and large study has found that acupuncture, and even simulated acupuncture using toothpicks, appears to relieve symptoms of chronic low back pain better than the standard treatment. The study was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and was published in last week’s issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The study which was done on 683 adults aged 18 to 70 with chronic lower back pain, found that 60 per cent of participants who received any one of three types of acupuncture - customized, standard and simulated acupuncture - reported they had improved function after eight weeks of treatment. That compares to just 39 per cent of those who received standard care of their choice, which could include a doctor’s visit, chiropractic treatment or massage. A follow-up one year later showed 59 per cent to 65 per cent of those in the acupuncture groups were still experiencing improvement, compared with 50 per cent of those in the usual-care group.

The fact that the simulated acupuncture had the same effect as the real acupuncture raises questions about how acupuncture works to relieve pain, the authors note.

More about this in the video below with Dr. Rhonda Low from CTV:

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The Alexander Technique: realign your body

The Alexander Technique is a method that works to change movement habits in our everyday activities. It is a simple and practical method for improving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support and coordination. The technique teaches the use of the appropriate amount of effort for a particular activity, giving you more energy for all your activities. It is not a series of treatments or exercises, but rather a reeducation of the mind and body. It is promoted for the alleviation of back pain, rehabilitation after accidents, improving breathing, playing musical instruments and singing.

The technique dates back to the 1890s when Frederick Matthias Alexander (1869-1955), an actor who began his career as a Shakespearean orator, developed chronic laryngitis while performing. Determined to restore the full use of his voice, he carefully watched himself while speaking, and observed that undue muscular tension accounted for his vocal problem. He sought a way to eliminate that restriction. Over time, he discovered and articulated a principle that profoundly influences health and well-being: when neck tension is reduced, the head no longer compresses the spine and the spine is free to lengthen. From this work on himself and others, he evolved this hands-on teaching method that encourages all the body processes to work more efficiently - as an integrated, dynamic whole.

The Alexander Technique is not something you can learn from a video or a book. You need a teacher to review your own personal situation and guide you, so taking lessons is very important. If you are in the New York area, I suggest you contact Mark Josefsberg who is a certified Alexander Technique teacher. You can find a lot of informative articles and videos regarding this topic, as well as his contact information on his website at www.MarkJosefsberg.com .

You can find a detailed guide about the technique at AlexanderTechnique.com. Dr. Rhonda Low from CTV explains it more in the video below:

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