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Tag: Healthy Food

Mediterranean diet can help people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

Mediterranean diet has been found to drastically reduce the risk of getting type 2 diabetes. In fact, a study published in May 2008 in the online edition of The British Medical Journal showed that people who adhered to Mediterranean diet had an 83% reduction in their risk of developing diabetes, while those who moderately followed the diet had their risk reduced by 59%. But now, a new research found that it can help those who are newly diagnosed as well.

The study split over 200 overweight people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes into two diets. One with low fat and the other one with Mediterranean diet, and the findings were quite remarkable. After four years, only 44% of those who followed the Mediterranean diet needed medications, compared to 70% who followed a low fat diet.

More about this and the Mediterranean diet below with Monica Matys:

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New study shows benefits of Mediterranean diet for heart health

A new study supported by The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health concluded that eating a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables and nuts helps protect the heart. The research, which was led by Dr. Sonia Anand of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, analyzed almost 200 studies, involving millions of people, which were published from 1950 till June 2007. The study was published last Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The Mediterranean diet involves high consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts that are not roasted or salted, cheese or yogurt, whole grains, fish, and monosaturated fats such as olive oil and avocados. The research also confirmed that trans-fatty acids are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Starchy carbohydrates such as white bread, white rice and white potatoes that are high on the glycemic index were also linked to an increased risk of heart disease.

More information about this in the interview below by CBC with Dr. Sonia Anand:

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Lots of red meat increases the risk of premature death

Last week, the largest study of its kind published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that those who ate large amounts of red meat and processed meats faced a greater risk of death from heart disease and cancer. In contrast, a higher intake of white meat was associated with a slightly reduced risk of death over the same period.

The researchers from the US National Cancer Institute, led by Dr. Rashmi Sinha, evaluated more than 500,000 men and women over a 10 year period. For the study, red meat included beef, pork, bacon, ham, hamburger, hot dogs, liver, pork sausage, steak, and meats in foods such as pizza, stews, and lasagna. White meat included turkey, fish, chicken, chicken mixtures, and other meats. Processed meat was either white or red meat that was cured, dried, or smoked, Sinha said, such as bacon, chicken sausage, lunch meats, and cold cuts.

More about this in the video below by Dr. Rhonda Low from CTV:

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Açaí: the magical fruit

I have recently been introduced by a friend of mine to a new fruit named Açaí. It has only been exposed to the West a couple of years ago. Since not too many people have heard of it, I decided to introduce it here, with an emphasis on its extraordinary antioxidant effect and its benefits to our health.

Açaí is a fruit that grows on the Açaí Palm Trees in the Amazon rain forest of Brazil. The Açaí berry is small in size (smaller than a grape) and is dark purple in color. Açaí is mostly seed, covered in a small amount of pulp. In fact, about 80% of the Açaí berry is seed, which is not eaten.

While Açaí may be small in size, it packs a nutritional punch unlike any other food in the world. Açaí is one of the highest antioxidant fruits in the world. Açaí has 10 times the antioxidant level of grapes and twice that of blueberries. Açaí has 10 to 30 times the Anthocyanins of red wine. The Açaí berry is very rich in healthy Omega fats. Nearly 50% of the Açaí berry is fat - with 74% of the fat coming from healthy unsaturated fats such as Omega 3, Omega 6 and Omega 9. Açaí is also a good source of proteins. 7.59% of the weight of the Açaí pulp is from amino acids. 19 different amino acids have been identified in Açaí . Since amino acids are the building blocks of protein, it is no surprise that you have over 8 grams of protein in a 100 gram serving of Açaí . Moreover, it contains a lot of vitamins and minerals. Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C and E are all present in Açaí . In addition, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc are all found in Açaí . As for fiber, there are about 14 grams of fiber in every 100 grams of freeze dried Açaí powder.

Due to their high content of fat, Açaí berries will go rancid very quickly, usually in a day or two. Therefore, if you don’t live in the Amazon rain forest, getting fresh Açaí berries can be close to impossible. But to get it to the West, Açaí can come in two forms and at a very expensive price: frozen pulp or freeze dried powder.

For more information, you can find a detailed report on Açaí at the PowerSupplements.com website.
Some scientific studies made on Açaí can be found at the AcaiHealthInfo.com website.

Açaí berries

Açaí berries

Mediterranean diet can help protect your brain

Past research has shown that following a Mediterranean diet can help protect from heart diseases and diabetes, but now there is a new evidence that it could protect your brain as well. The study, performed by doctors from Columbia University, followed 1800 seniors over a five year period. One of the things it found is that people with no memory problem, who followed a Mediterranean diet, reduced their risks of developing cognitive impairment by 28%. Those with some memory problems reduced the risk of developing a full blown Alzheimer’s by half.

Dr. Rhonda Low from CTV explains it more in the following video:

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Huge price discrepancy of healthy food between and within Canadian cities

In its annual report on Canadian Health, the Heart and Stroke foundation found that there is a huge difference of prices for healthy food between cities, and within cities as well. The report looked at 66 communities across Canada between Oct. 15 and Oct. 25, 2008. An example of such difference is the following: one kilogram of lean ground beef was $13.21 in Ottawa, but only $4.14 in Barrie, Ont. In contrast, there was little variation in the cost of snack foods such as cookies, potato chips and pop that should be consumed in moderation.

In addition to that, healthier foods were found to be more expensive. For instance, margarine with trans fats cost on average $2.79 compared with $3.29 for trans-fat-free margarine. A survey accompanying the report suggested that 47% of Canadians reported occasionally going without fresh fruit, vegetables, dairy products, whole grain products, meat or fish because of high cost. Healthy eating is a key factor in preventing heart disease.

Watch the following interview by CBC with Stephen Samis, director of health policy for the Heart and Stroke Foundation:

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Mediterranean diet with added handful of nuts

Spanish researchers have found that people who followed a Mediterranean diet and added a few daily handfuls of nuts were 70% more likely to reduce their metabolic disorder. Specifically the participants ate walnuts, hazelnuts, and almonds.

Watch Dr. Rhonda Low from CTV talk about it:

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