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It’s Christmas, not Xmas

We see it every year, without paying much attention to it. We say it every year, without being aware of it. It’s the word Xmas, which is a substitute of Christmas. It bothers me when people use the word Xmas instead of Christmas, because they are substituting the Christ by an X. After all, ‘X’ is an abbreviation of ‘Ex’ (such as extreme, extra, etc…), and does not represent, in any form or another, the word ‘Christ’.

Out of respect for Christianity, I suggest you use the word Christmas instead of Xmas.

Meanwhile, I leave you with this Jingle Bells song, Punjabi style, and I wish you a Merry Christmas full of joy and happiness to you and your family:

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Comments

Comment from Roland Abi-abdallah
Time December 25, 2009 at 1:54 PM

I totally agree with you Rabih, some ppl dont pay attention to it but some other do..

Comment from H.
Time December 26, 2009 at 12:14 PM

Totally true Rabih!
Thank you for sharing this with us! :)

Comment from R
Time December 31, 2009 at 11:51 AM

“Xmas” is not originally an attempt to exclude Christ from Christmas, but uses an abbreviation of the Greek spelling of the word “Christ” with the “X” representing the Greek letter chi. However, so few people know this that it is probably better not to use this popular abbreviation in religious contexts.

Comment from R
Time December 31, 2009 at 12:02 PM

The word “Christ” and its compounds, including “Christmas”, have been abbreviated in English for at least the past 1,000 years, long before the modern “Xmas” was commonly used. “Christ” was often written as “XP” or “Xt”; there are references in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as far back as AD 1021. This X and P arose as the uppercase forms of the Greek letters χ and ρ used in ancient abbreviations for Χριστος (Greek for “Christ”), and are still widely seen in many Eastern Orthodox icons depicting Jesus Christ. The labarum, an amalgamation of the two Greek letters rendered as ☧, is a symbol often used to represent Christ in Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox Christian Churches.[14]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xmas

Comment from admin
Time December 31, 2009 at 1:02 PM

R,
Even though it had been abbreviated for the past 1,000 years, that doesn’t mean it’s rightly used. I do acknowledge that Χριστος means Christ in Greek and was abbreviated Xp, but still, it doesn’t make sense (to me) to use the first letter of the Greek name to substitute the whole name in the holiday greeting in English language.

Comment from R
Time December 31, 2009 at 2:47 PM

Admin,

I have no doubt that some people write xmas because they are too busy or too lazy to write out the whole word and no doubt some secular people, who are just as uninformed as christian see xmas as a way to avoid writing ‘christ’. Also, there are commercial motives behing the word “xmas”..

but i think those factors do not take away the thoroughly Christian origin of the word ‘xmas’

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